aboutus.html
Vision
     We dream of Filipinos who passionately
love their country and whose values and
competencies enable them to realize their full
potential and contribute meaningfully to
building the nation.
     As learner-centered public institution, the
Department of Education continuously
improves itself to better serve its stakeholders.
Teaching & Non-Teaching Staff
ELEANOR D. ESTABELLO        
JOY P. PANEN
ARACELI B. MANGA
ELVIE P. GARCIA
CHERRY P. ROS
KRISTINE T. OROLFO
MELINDA O. D LA FUENTE
PERLA O. ODOÑO
ELLA MICHELLE G. IMPERIAL
JUDITH D. TORRES
SOCORRO C. PINTOR
DELILAH H. MANGENTE
ALAN L. MATIAS, Ph.D
NEMIE E. MECAYER
SHEILA P. TAÑANG
SHIRLEY P. VALLADOLID
MELINDA A. OLIVARES
ZELDA B. LITERAL
ANTONIA L. NEBRES
SUSANA M. PROLLAMANTE
BELINDA B. BONACUA
MARILOU J. MORANTE
GRISELDA P. RONCESVALLES
ARLENE R. CENITA
RACHEL R. BALTAZAR
SARAH R. POJA
GIRLIE H. GANGAWAN
JHON M. CONCEPCION
CARLO ELIZONDO
RODOLFO P. TUASON


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"Taga-DepEd Ako (Titser)"
composed by: JIREH F. OROBIA

Here, to protect
and promote the right
of every Filipino to quality,
equitable, culture-based,
and complete basic education

Maka-Diyos
Maka-tao
Makakalikasan
Makabansa
(2x)

Training up a child
in the way he should go;
and when he's old,
he'll not depart from it
Full of patience,
Love and care
Learner-centered institution

Maging huwaran
Daluyan ng kaalaman
Isip at puso
TAGA-DEPED AKO!
(2x)

Description/ History of the School

During the Spanish times, the Minister of Colonies,
Jose dela Concha, promulgated the Educational
Decree of 1863 which provided that one public primary
school for boys and girls be opened in every
municipality of the Philippines. In 1887, a school
building was constructed during Presidente Municipal
Pio Balana’s term of office. Due to lack of funds and
teachers plus the popularity of parochial schools at that
time, the building was never used as a school house.

     When the American soldiers, reached Ligao in
1900, the first organized class was held under a
Talisay tree in front of the Municipal building. Attracted
by free books, notebooks, pencils, papers, slates and
candies, pupils from six to forty years old enrolled in
this class.

     On January 21, 1900, with the passage of Act No.
74, the first organic school law providing free primary
education in English, a public school was established
in every municipality.

     In 1902, the organized classes were housed in the
building now known as the LIGAO WEST CENTRAL
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (POBLACION). This school
was formerly known as PRIMARY SCHOOL, and then
changed to LIGAO OLD EAST CENTRAL ELEMENTARY
SCHOOL.

The pupils were then classified into three classes of
grades, Class C or Grade 1, Class B or Grade II, and
Class A, Grade III depending upon the pupils’ abilities
or academic background. After a few weeks, those who
were grouped under Class A and those attending
training in the seminary at Naga were singled out and
assigned as teachers. Once or twice a week they were
coached by the American teachers on what to teach
their pupils for the next few days. The soldiers turned
teachers carried on their job of spreading education
until the Thomasites, American civilians who were
professionally trained teachers, came and took over
their work. Among the Thomasites who worked in
Ligao either as supervisors, principals or classroom
teachers were Melvin W. Fox, James McGregor, Nelia
McGregor, Grace Short, Milton G., Marshall, Norman A.
Cutler, and F.W. Preassy was the last American
principal in Ligao. He died in Ligao in 1916. He was
succeeded by Ramon Ruivivar, the first Filipino
principal in Ligao.

     The primary school teachers were Apolonio del
Valle, Cirila Alvarado, Juliana Quintano and others.

     From 1934-1907, primary course was only three
years. I offered such subjects as reading, writing,
arithmetic, English grammar, geography, physiology,
nature study, music, drawing, physical exercise and
industrial work. In 1907, the primary course was
revised and lengthened to four years. This course
became richer with the addition of civics physiology and
hygiene and it prescribed more industrial work.

     At the time of Japanese occupation, complete
elementary classes were opened in June 1943. Ito-
San, a Japanese soldier-educator supervised the
class. Francisco Ruivivar a pre-war public school
principal of the school. Ramon O. Sanchez, Aurora F.
Armero and Porfiria Manlangit, pre-war public school
teachers of Ligao were assigned to teach. Others in the
teaching staff were Tomas Fernandez and Lolita Garcia
both of Daraga and Dominica S. Marano of Polangui.

     In this school, English and Filipino were used as
the medium of instruction. “Hanosi Wa Kataba” was
used as a reading material and “Katakara”  was the
form of writing used. Textbooks with stories about
American people and their ways of life, and artices with
democratic ideas were censored. “Bushido” (Japanese
culture) was included in the intermediate curriculum.
Nipongo and Pilipino were also taught as separate
subjects. “Radio Taiso” (Calisthenics) was given
stress in the curriculum.

     On September 14, 1944, the school was again
closed when American fighter planes sprayed the
railroad station with bullet that claim the lives of five
innocent by-standers. This incident made many
families return again to their mountain hideouts.

     Liberation period came in June, 1945, schools
opened and Ligao Primary School had only Grades 1
and II classes until 1966.

     School Year 1966-1967 was the opening of Grades
III classes, 1967-1968, Grade IV classes and in 1969-
1970, the first Grade six pupils graduated from the
Ligao East Central Elementary School.

     The Ligao Primary School had been always under
the principal of the Ligao West Central School with only
a teacher in-charge to take care of the needed reports.
A separate principal was assigned in 1962-1963 in the
person of Santos Bocaya followed by Demetrio
Romano. In 1966-1967, Miss Adelaida Morcoso, a
head teacher, took over and she was responsible for
accommodating the complete elementary classes in
the school.

     To accommodate more pupils, she had thebig
classroom divided. Together with their co-teachers,
they raised funds to have a concrete fence for the
school site and a bigger comfort room. She made
possible the construction of a Home Economics
building and the Army Type building.
In 1970-1971, Ligao District was divided into Ligao District
1 and Ligao District II. The Ligao Old East Central
Elementary School under Mrs. Antonina Mustera
encountered problems in accommodating enrolled pupils.
Seven classes were transferred to the Ligao West District
at the opening of the school year 1975-1976. The school
was then made a part of the Ligao West District. The Ligao
East District Office was then moved to Tuburan Elementary
School.

    The remaining classes of six sections of Grade I, five
sections of Grade II, one section of Grade III. Two sections
of Grade IV and one section of Grade V and VI were existing
classes when Mrs. Expectacion Ruivivar was assigned as
the next principal of the school.I

The following school year, Mrs. Expectacion D. Ruivivar
effected a reorganization of classes. Three sections each
were given the first three grades and two sections each for
the remaining three grades.

    In 1980-1981, Mrs. Ruivivar was promoted to Principal II
in Guinobatan East District, Guinobatan Albay. Mr. Antonio
Pesito took over as the Principal until he retired on October
, 1985. It was on his administration that a new name –
LIGAO WEST CENTRAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
(POBLACION)- was given this school during the school
year 1982-1983.

    This school was the under the Principal II of LIGAO
WEST CENTRAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (BINATAGAN)
with Mr. Aniceto Broma as the District Supervisor. Mr.
Antonio J. Rabe assumed office as school principal on
December 3, 1985. During the school year 1986-1987, he
requested for an additional teacher and made possible the
opening of Grade V.

    The 4-3 plan in the intermediate grades cannot produce
the desired quality outcomes for students. So, in 1989, the
request for additional teachers in the intermediate was
honored with the Grade VI then opening under the 5-3 plan.
Again, in 1992, the request for an additional teacher was
granted with the Grade V classes operating under 5-3 plan.
With these plans, the school can expect for quality
outcomes of students.

    This school was fatally ruined by typhoon Sisang. Only
the Home Economics building was left standing but also
partially ruined. Classes during this period were housed in
private houses. The Barbin family offered their bodega, the
Ligao Fire Department, their garage., the Foster Parents
Plan, their corridor and the other five classes were taught in
the houses of teachers. Books, devices and other school
materials were blown away by the typhoon.

    The Department of Public Works and Highways came to
our rescue as well as the Asian Development Bank and the
DECS under its repair program with Mr. Jose Ravalo as the
Schools Division Superintendent with the strong
recommendation of Mr. Nicolas T. Amano. While the
buildings were ruined in 1987, they came into use again in
1990. Many stories can be told particularly on difficulties
met but the people of the agencies above have probably
been whispered by the Almighty that the school children in
this school are also like the school children in some other
schools whose buildings have already been paid attention
to.

    This school is not wanting in enrolment. The problem
here during enrolment period is on how to send enrollees
to other schools. This is the reason why every class in this
school has a big enrolment.
    
    In terms of performance, the school could be
categorically classified as academically progressive. It is
pulling the other central schools in its over-all performance
especially in the academic concerns.

    The retirement of Mr. Antonio J. Rabe, ushered in the
transfer of Mrs. Helen M. Abalos to the school as its new
principal. It was during her incumbency when the school
became the recipient of books and other reading materials
from the Children’s Foundation, Inc., a timely feat for the
opening of its first library-/ audio-visual room, a feat
generated through a fund campaign. It was also during
where computer classes from Grades IV-VI were held, her
innovation and considered the first in the history of the
school one of her priority concerns in order for the children.

    The customary reshuffle and promotions of school
heads in 2005 paved the way for Mrs. Abalos’ transfer to
Ligao West Central Elementary School (Binatagan). She
was replaced by Mrs. Zenaida Cabrera who only had a
short stint as principal because of her promotion as
Principal II position. It was during her time when typhoon
Milenyo struck and blew away half of the roof of the
Spanish-Type building and ruined parts of the amenities of
the school. Prompt repair and restoration however of the
Department of Public Works and Highways in partnership
with DepEd put back to normal and daily operation of the
school.

    When Mrs. Zenaida R. Cabrera was promoted to
Principal II, she was replaced by Mr. Constantino P.
Olivares, the incumbent principal of the school. The
opening of the pre-school class and the addition of another
section in Grade I are some of the innovations under his
term. He also caused the refurbishment of the Principal’s
Office and the common comfort room at the back of the
Spanish-Type building.

    Year 2012, reshuffling of school head was made by the
Superintendent. Mr. Olivares was replaced by Mrs. Helen S.
Martinez. Then Mrs. Emy P. Quiobe and on April 22, 2015;
RODOLFO P. TUASON was assigned as the Principal up
to present school year.

    At present, the Ligao West Central Elementary School
(Poblacion) has 29 teachers including the Principal and
with a total pupil population of nine hundred eighty-five
(985).
Mission
   To protect and promote the right of every
Filipino to quality, equitable, culture-based,
and complete basic education where:
•        Student learn in a child-friendly, gender-
sensitive, safe and motivating environment
•        Teachers facilitate learning and
constantly nurture every learner
•        Administrators and staff, as stewards
of the institution, ensure as enabling and
supportive environment for effective learning
to happen
•        Family, community, and other
stakeholders are actively engaged and
share responsibility for developing life-long
learners
INTRODUCTION